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Does Using a Mobile Phone Substantially Interfere with Driving?

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Talked about how mobile using interferes driving performance from different perspectives.

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5 Pages Essays / Projects < 1 Year old
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Does Using a Mobile Phone Substantially Interfere with Driving?
Topics this document covers:
Transport Technology Road safety Land transport Mobile phone New media Telephony Text messaging Distraction Attention Driving simulator Traffic collision
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Topics this document covers:
Transport Technology Road safety Land transport Mobile phone New media Telephony Text messaging Distraction Attention Driving simulator Traffic collision
Sample Text:
And the distractions such as, talking, eating, listening to music contributed a lot to those accidents. However, the problem of mobile phone using while driving has come to the sight of public recently. This essay is going to argue that mobile using has substantially interfered people’s driving performance by diverting people’s attention from the road. In the meantime the study conducted by Strayer, Drews, and Crowch (2006) has also indicated that when drivers were using either a handheld or hands-free cell phone, their driving performance will decrease and were more likely to get involved in traffic accidents than those who weren’t using any mobile devices. Moreover, Leung et al. (2012) supported this argument by claiming that hands-free conversation, and particularly texting...
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