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Assignment on the Privilege Against Self-Incrimination

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According to your final report, “the privilege against self-incrimination allows a person to refuse to answer any question, or produce any document or thing, if doing so would tend to expose the person to conviction for a crime” , allowing for protection of the freedom and dignity of the person in question. Thus, this privilege was created for a proper balance between the powers of the State and the rights and interests of citizens to prevent an abuse of power. It also aims to reserve the presumption of innocence and confirm that the burden of proof remains on the prosecution

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Assignment on the Privilege Against Self-Incrimination
Topics this document covers:
Law Evidence law Criminal law Criminal Procedure Privilege Right to silence Legal professional privilege in Australia Legal professional privilege Michelle McCabe Ben Saul
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Topics this document covers:
Law Evidence law Criminal law Criminal Procedure Privilege Right to silence Legal professional privilege in Australia Legal professional privilege Michelle McCabe Ben Saul
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What is the privilege against self-­incrimination According to your final report, “the privilege against self-­incrimination allows a person to refuse to answer any question, or produce any document or thing, if doing so would tend to expose the person to conviction for a crime” 1, allowing for protection of the freedom and dignity of the person in question. Thus, this privilege was created for a ...
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