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Tess of the D'Urbevilles Context and Techniques

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The techniques used in Thomas Hardy's Tess of the D'Urbevilles (1891), with reference to passages within the novel.

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4 Pages Partial Study Notes < 1 Year old
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Tess of the D'Urbevilles Context and Techniques
Topics this document covers:
Literature Film Feminist theory Critical theory Tess of the d'Urbervilles Tess Male gaze Gaze Thomas Hardy Tess Durbeyfield
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Topics this document covers:
Literature Film Feminist theory Critical theory Tess of the d'Urbervilles Tess Male gaze Gaze Thomas Hardy Tess Durbeyfield
Sample Text:
The patriarchy sees women in the same way that they see the landscape - as ripe for inscription of their own discursive projects and activities. They rape and fragment the natural landscape much as they fragment and inscribe the woman, by means of the inexorability/implacability of their gaze ... Techniques: ● Two kinds of gaze: ■ A sophisticated response will evaluate between the two. Are they the same Contention. ○ Male gaze that Hardy refers to (objectification) ○ Hardy’s gaze - Frames her in ways ○ Frame is always disrupted in some way and she escapes. ○ At times she disappears an...
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