Subjects under University of New South Wales
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Property Law Notes

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Complete - full semester 67 pages of property law notes under sub headings. New South Wales based legislation and cases.

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67 Pages Complete Study Notes > 2 Years old
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Topics this document covers:
Property law Law Common law Real property law Tort law Personal property law Bailment Detinue Conversion Lien Adverse possession Trespass
This is a Complete Set of Study Notes

Complete Study Notes typically cover at least half a semester’s content or several topics in greater depth. They are typically greater than 20 pages in length and go into more detail when covering topics.

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Topics this document covers:
Property law Law Common law Real property law Tort law Personal property law Bailment Detinue Conversion Lien Adverse possession Trespass
Sample Text:
Types: bailment hire purchase agreements contracts for sale of chattels stranger finds lost chattel • LEGAL RIGHTS GAINED BY POSSESSION Possession where the true owner has not come forward gives a legal right which the law would support against all except the true owner - Armory v Delamirie (1722) Possessory title is absolute against everyone except the absolute owner – Russel v Wilson (1923) HC Affords rights that are equally lawful and powerful, except against the absolute owner or any person claiming to hold by virtue of the owner’s authority - Russel v Wilson (1923) HC Possession is not only evidence of ownership, it is effective ownership against the whole world except someone who can provide better title – R v McKiernan [2003] QCA Employee or agent holding property for another not automatic right to poss...
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