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ARTS2093 Notes

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A complete semester of ARTS2093 notes from the given readings each week. Goes through each reading comprehensively and highlighting the key concepts and examples needed for the Final Exam.

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20 Pages Complete Study Notes > 2 Years old* Previously uploaded under: ARTS2093 - Global Media
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Topics this document covers:
Social media Computing Technology Information science Web 2.0 Knowledge representation Communication Mass media Hashtag Microblogging Social presence theory Framing
This is a Complete Set of Study Notes

Complete Study Notes typically cover at least half a semester’s content or several topics in greater depth. They are typically greater than 20 pages in length and go into more detail when covering topics.

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Topics this document covers:
Social media Computing Technology Information science Web 2.0 Knowledge representation Communication Mass media Hashtag Microblogging Social presence theory Framing
Sample Text:
, Unger, J., Barton, D. & Zappavigna, M. (2014). ​Researching language and social media: A student guide​. London: Routledge. ● Social media = Internet­based services that promote social interaction between participants. ● Often distinguished from forms of mass media, where it delivers content via a network of participants where it can be published by anyone but can be distributed across potentially large­scale audiences. ● Web 2.0 is better understood as a rhetorical label which was particularly important for strategically reframing e­commerce in the early 21st century (e.g. Wiki, Encyclopedia) ● Working from a media theory perspective, Kaplan and Haenlein (2009) draw on social presence theory and media richness to compare the different ways in which participants might engage in interactions that are more or less direct ...
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