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Notions of Loss in Citizen Kane

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Year 12 english essay on the engagement with the notion of loss in Orson Welles' 1941 film Citizen Kane and its impact on understanding of the film. In the style of the HSC module B.

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Notions of Loss in Citizen Kane
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Fiction Film Cinema of the United States Citizen Kane Charles Foster Kane Orson Welles Kane Kane Essay
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Fiction Film Cinema of the United States Citizen Kane Charles Foster Kane Orson Welles Kane Kane Essay
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’ How does this represent your understanding of Orson Welles’ film Exploring the notion of loss within the critical study of Orson Welles’ film Citizen Kane is pivotal to achieving a greater understanding of the mystery of human nature through close engagement with the influence of loss on an individual’s life. Throughout the quasi-biographical mystery drama, the enigmatic character of Charles Foster Kane is explored through the recollections of the people closest to him, depicting contrasting interpretations of the man and presenting a “multiplicity of selves”, as observed by Noel Carroll. In particular are the ideas that it was Kane’s loss of childhood innocence and maternal love that resulted in his lack of empathy and ability to love, yet an alternative understanding of the character asserts that it was Kane’s materialistic, power-...
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