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Assessment Task 4 - Essay on Dystopias

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This is an essay on dystopias relating to The Truman Show and also V for Vendetta. It highlights the role of constant surveillance, commercialism, as well as the abuse of power/authority.

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Assessment Task 4 - Essay on Dystopias
Topics this document covers:
Fiction Literature English-language films Digital rights Human rights Films V for Vendetta V Adam Susan Dystopia Utopian and dystopian fiction The Truman Show Peter Weir James McTeigue
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Topics this document covers:
Fiction Literature English-language films Digital rights Human rights Films V for Vendetta V Adam Susan Dystopia Utopian and dystopian fiction The Truman Show Peter Weir James McTeigue
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A society in which you have no individual choice. There is no independence, freedom and certainly no personal thought. This is an example of a dystopian society, where the citizens are made to believe that these are the most ideal living conditions. Dystopias might be fiction, but they are very much about the world of the audience. Many films have been based on these fictional societies, however, two dystopian films that communicate this idea very effectively are The Truman Show directed by Peter Weir and V for Vendetta by James McTeigue. Peter Weir’s The Truman Show, uses themes which are relevant to any society at any given time to convey certain messages. It indicates that media and commercialism have a highly influential role in today’s society and it has to be admitted that they are an unavoidable p...
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