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Shipwrecks and Corrosion Chemistry HSC

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Very useful, full in-depth notes on the option topic 'Shipwrecks and Corrosion".

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17 Pages Partial Study Notes 1-2 Years old
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Shipwrecks and Corrosion Chemistry HSC
Topics this document covers:
Chemistry Electromagnetism Nature Electrochemistry Corrosion Physical chemistry Chemical reactions Rust Electrolysis Galvanic anode Anode Redox
This is a Partial Set of Study Notes

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Topics this document covers:
Chemistry Electromagnetism Nature Electrochemistry Corrosion Physical chemistry Chemical reactions Rust Electrolysis Galvanic anode Anode Redox
Sample Text:
1 Identify the origins of the minerals in oceans as leaching by rainwater from terrestrial environments & hydrothermal vents in mid-ocean ridges: • Sea water contains about 35g salts/L (this varies with temperature; higher temperature, higher concentration of salt) • 78% of the oceans’ salt is NaCl; 16% is Mg salts; 6% is K salts • Main cations and anions in sea water: Cations Anions Sodium Chlorides Potassium Carbonates Calcium Sulfates Magnesium Bromides Leaching by rainwater from terrestrial environment: • Rainwater seeps over the Earth, dissolving minerals from rocks and soils, and carries them via ground water or rivers into the oceans • The ions dissolved vary according to the composition of the rocks/soil through which the water gets into (i.e. water that had moved through limestone would be high in calcium and car...
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