Subjects under Flinders University
Document Details

CRIM1101 Full Notes

User Description:
CRIM1101 Full Notes - very detailed, complete from Week 1 - 13, received a Distinction mark using these

Thinkswap Satisfaction Guarantee

Each document purchased on Thinkswap is covered by our Satisfaction Guarantee policy. If you are not satisfied with the quality of any document, or you believe the document was incorrectly described or categorised, Thinkswap will provide a full refund of exchange credits so you can check out another document. For more information please click here.

This student studied:
Claim a Thinkswap Bounty

Do you know if the Subject listed above has changed recently? Click report to earn free Exchange Credits!

Document Information:
39 Pages Complete Study Notes > 2 Years old
Share

5 Ex Credits


Document Screenshots:
Topics this document covers:
Criminology Marxist criminology Critical criminology Deviance Public-order crime Crime State crime Victimology Social disorganization theory Environmental criminology Criminalization White-collar crime Zemiology
This is a Complete Set of Study Notes

Complete Study Notes typically cover at least half a semester’s content or several topics in greater depth. They are typically greater than 20 pages in length and go into more detail when covering topics.

What are Exchange Credits:

Exchange Credits represent the worth of each document on Thinkswap. In exchange for uploading documents you will receive credits. These can then be used to checkout other documents on Thinkswap.

Topics this document covers:
Criminology Marxist criminology Critical criminology Deviance Public-order crime Crime State crime Victimology Social disorganization theory Environmental criminology Criminalization White-collar crime Zemiology
Sample Text:
n of how we define crime, and how we define the perpetrators and victims of crime, is inextricably bound up with social processes there tends to be broad agreement that certain types of activities are harmful and represent significant enough wrongdoing to warrant state sanction Defining Crime we can summarize broad differences in definition in the following way: ➢ formal legal definition – regards crime as that activity defined by the state ➢ social harm conception – considers crime to involve both criminal offences and civil offences, given that each type of action or inaction brings with it some type of harm ➢ crosscultural universal norms perspective – states that crime is ubiquitous ➢ labelling approach – argues that crime only exists when there has been a social response to a particular activity that labels that activity as criminal ➢ human rights approach ...
Similar Documents to CRIM1101 Full Notes

Essay

This student studied:
University of New South Wales - CRIM1010 - Introduction to Criminology

Examine Classical theory and Psychological Positivism and explore their influence on the modern criminal justice system. Why do you think these theories were so influential throughout the 20th and 21st century? What are their limitations? In your answer, you should briefly explain the central tenets of each theory. Please focus especially on their long-term impact on the contemporary criminal justice system and our understandings of both crime and offenders.

2 Ex Credits

View Details

Complete Exam Notes 2014

This student studied:
University of New South Wales - CRIM1010 - Introduction to Criminology

2014 current exam study notes covering all topics of the course with in depth notes

5 Ex Credits

View Details

CRIM1010 Reading Notes

This student studied:
University of New South Wales - CRIM1010 - Introduction to Criminology

What are key weaknesses of a legal definition of crime? Legal definition of crime: regards crime as that activity defined by the state; that is, if an act is proscribed by the criminal law, and is subject to state sanction in the form of a specific penalty, then it is a crime. • The state has the ultimate power to shape the reality of crime and how society responds to that reality. • Overlooks the fact that ‘the law’ itself is deeply problematic. • Narrow conception of harm, deviance, anti-social conduct, injustices and rule-breaking. • Often disregards the issue of state-sponsored actions that may themselves be sources of considerable harm, but which are not criminalised by the same state.

5 Ex Credits

View Details

Criminology and Law Complete Notes

This student studied:
Monash University - LAW1114 - Criminal Law 1

Introduction to Criminology Theories of Criminology Theories of Punishment Juvenile Delequency

5 Ex Credits

View Details